Suche


Navigation

Smalltalk auf Englisch
Englisch Smalltak - Smalltak auf Messen und Reisen, reden über Job und Familie, Urlaub, Sport und das Wetter. Fragen nach dem Befinden. Unterhalten auf Englisch.

Korrespondenz auf Englisch
englische Korrespondenz, englische Briefe verfassen, englische Angebote, englische Mahnbriefe, englische Weihnachtsgrüße, Beschwerdebriefe auf Englisch, Zahlen auf Englisch Korrespondenz

Geschäftsreise auf Englisch
Englisch für die Geschäftsreise, Englisch auf Reisen, Business-Englisch auf Geschäftsreisen, Englisch lernen für Geschäftsreisen

Telefonieren auf Englisch
Englisch Anrufbeantworter, Anruf entgegennehmen auf Englisch, Nachricht hinterlassen auf Englisch, Buchstabieren auf Englisch, Begrüßung auf Englisch

Meetings auf Englisch
Besprechungen auf Englisch, English for Meetings, Englisch für Meetings, Business English Meetings, Meetings in Englisch, Meetings Englisch, Business Englisch Meetings, englischsprachige Meetings

Grammatik auf Englisch
Englische Grammatik, Zeiten in Englisch, Indirekte Rede in Englisch, Präpositionen auf Englisch, englische Satzzeichen, Bedingungssätze auf Englisch, aktiv und passiv Englisch, Konditionalsätze auf Englisch


 

Grammatik auf Englisch - Fragen formulieren

Schlagwörter: Grammatik auf Englisch, Englisch Grammatik, Englische Grammatik, Englisch Grammar, Gramatik auf Englisch, Englisch Gramatik, Englische Gramatik, Englisch Grammar, Fragen auf Englisch, Englisch fragen, Englische Frage, Fragesatz Englisch, Englischer Fragesatz

In a meeting with a customer, you are sitting next to a project team member you have never met. You are acquainted with someone else on the team named Janet, and you know that all of the customer's project team members know Janet. You ask the person next to you: "Where is Janet?"

The person says "I have no idea". You think his tone sounded a bit annoyed, and he looked away as soon as the last word left his lips. One of the first problems here is that you didn't introduce yourself first. The second is that you asked a direct question. In English, unless you have a close working or personal relationship with someone, direct questions can sound rude - especially with strangers. Knowing how to formulate indirect questions is thus very important.

Before looking at how direct and indirect questions are formed, it's helpful to review the rules for formulating basic sentences:

Positive sentence structure:

subject + verbs + (indirect object) + (object) + (place) + (time)



Examples:

We meet every day.

She gives him the report in the front office every morning.



Negative sentence structure:

subject + negation + verbs + (indirect object) + (object) + (place) + (time) + (other)

negation=do not, don't, doesn't



Examples:

We do not meet every day.

She does not give him the report in the front office every morning.



Direct questions

Most questions people ask are direct questions that ask about the subject or object of the sentence. The structure of object questions is:

?Word + auxiliary + subject + verb + (place) + (time) + (other)

?Word =
where, when, what, who, what kind

auxiliary = do, will, might, should, could, would or any verb when no other verb is used


Examples:

Where do you work?

What do you do?

When will she arrive at the office?

What should he do now?

Who does he work for?

What kind of report should I write?

Who did Sylvia see?


Direct questions about the subject are also possible. They ask about the subject of the sentence. The structure of subject questions using question words is:

?Word + subject + (auxiliary) + verb + (place) + (time) + (other)

?Word =
who*, what**, which, how, how many, what kind, whose

auxiliary = do, will, might, should, could, would


*who usually acts as the subject of the question.
**what sometimes acts as the subject of the question.



Examples:

Which project will finish first this month?

What type of printer would be best for our needs?

Who will be our new CEO?

What time is it?

Who is your manager?



The structure of subject questions without question words is:

(auxiliary) + subject + verb + (place) + (time) + (other)

auxiliary = do, will, might, should, could, would, is


Examples:

Is he coming to the event this evening?

Will she be arriving on time?

Does he believe it is a good decision?



Note: in all of the above structures, the verb may be in any tense, and may also use the active or passive voice.

Indirect questions


An indirect question consists of an introductory phrase which softens the question and makes it sound more polite, followed by a question in positive sentence structure:

Intro phrase + ?Word or ?if? + positive sentence structure


Here are some of the most common introductory phrases:

Do you know...?

Do you happen to know if/when/how...?

Can/Could you tell me...?

Have you any idea...?

Would you mind telling me...?



Indirect questions may also be sentences that imply a question. When using this construct, the tone of your voice should raise at the end of the sentence as with a normal question. Common introductory phrases for this type of question are:

I have no idea...

I?d like to know...

I?m not sure...

I wonder / was wondering...

I don?t know...



Examples:

I was wondering if they meet every day.

I?m not sure if she tries to take a break every day.

I don?t know if she tries to take a break every day.

I?d like to know when we will be taking breaks today.



Introductory phrases can also be combined to create an extra-polite effect:

I was wondering if you could tell me where the men?s/ ladies? room is.


The structure being used here is:

(intro + if + intro + ?Word + subject + verb)



Questioning ? Rules to remember

As a general rule, the subject always follows the first verb. Also note:


statement without auxiliary
question with does or doesn?t


Examples:
Elizabeth manages the team. Does Elizabeth manage the team?

Elizabeth eats lunch. Does Elizabeth eat lunch?


statement with auxiliary
question with auxiliary


Examples:

Byron will attend the meeting. Will Byron attend the meeting?

Byron has worked here for three years. Has Byron worked here for three years? How long has Byron worked here?

Elizabeth is eating lunch. Is Elizabeth eating lunch?

Schlagwörter: Grammatik auf Englisch, Englisch Grammatik, Englische Grammatik, Englisch Grammar, Gramatik auf Englisch, Englisch Gramatik, Englische Gramatik, Englisch Grammar, Fragen auf Englisch, Englisch fragen, Englische Frage, Fragesatz Englisch, Englischer Fragesatz

Business English Trainer Weitere Artikel zum Thema Grammatik auf Englisch finden Sie in unserem monatlich erscheinenden OWAD Business English Trainer.
Testen Sie drei Ausgaben von OWAD Business English Trainer kostenlos. Die erste Ausgabe erhalten Sie jetzt sofort, die anderen beiden während der nächsten zwei Monate.

Hier geht's zur Bestellung.

Archiv

Insiders Wordpower
Insiders Wordpower
mehr...
Business English Trainer
OWAD Business English Trainer
mehr...
OWAD
OWAD
mehr...
Free Test
Free-Test
mehr...
Seminars
Seminars
Meet Paul Smith face to face in one of his popular seminars and trainings.
mehr...
Owad-For-Business
Owad-For-Business
mehr...