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Grammatik auf Englisch - Groß- und Kleinschreibung: Faustregeln

Schlagwörter: Grammatik auf Englisch, Englisch Grammatik, Englische Grammatik, Englisch Grammar, Gramatik auf Englisch, Englisch Gramatik, Englische Gramatik, Englisch Grammar, Groß- und Kleinschreibung Englisch, Englische Groß- und Kleinschreibung, Faustregeln

Compared with English, the issue of capitalization in German is nearly a non-issue. Just capitalize every noun. English isn’t so easy, and this shows up in the emails Germans write to colleagues in other countries. There are many rules, and it’s difficult to keep all of them in mind at the same time. Mistakes are therefore common. But there are a few blanket rules that can help you get it right almost every time.

The rules
Always capitalize the first word of a sentence.

The pen rolled off the table.
Could you please forward that email to me?


Always capitalize the personal pronoun I.
I’m afraid I just don’t understand.
Do you mind if I smoke?


Always capitalize acronyms.
FBI, CIA, UA, NATO

Always capitalize proper nouns.
This includes the names and titles of persons, the names of places, days, months, sports teams, nationalities, countries, ethnic groups, religions, television shows, plays, operas, works of art, historical documents and events, and the names of animals and things.

In essence, capitalize everything that is a name!
Mary gave me some very bad advice.
I think you should ask Mary about that.
Liz used to live in Denver, Colorado.
Should we invite the Collinses?
I never liked the Dallas Cowboys.
Manchester United is very famous.
How about Monday?
My mother was Hungarian.
I think I saw Nan yesterday.
Let’s invite Doctor Jeffries to speak.
Russia just annexed the Crimea.
Cindy is a Catholic.
Christmas is a Christian holiday.
Did you hear about the scandal involving Lady Dedlock?
Every boy wants to be Captain Jack Sparrow.
Are you Asian, Hispanic, Black, or Caucasian?
I just got a call from Uncle Jack.
We went boating on Lake Winnipeg.
The Great Lakes are shared by the US and Canada.
Our office is located on Barnacle Street.
My mother-in-law was born in the Protozoan.
The zoo just put down Laughy the elephant.
Why don’t we buy a few Billy bookcases from IKEA?
Have you seen The Barber of Seville?


There’s a trick to knowing whether to capitalize a title or not. Here’s the test:

If the title refers to a unique person, and the title is usually used as part of that person’s name and not to refer to a job in general, capitalize it. Otherwise it should be lowercase — especially if it follows the name or stands alone. Consider the difference:

We visited the Sydney opera house.
We visited the Sydney Opera House.


The first example refers to the opera house in Sydney without mentioning it by name. The second example uses the name of the opera house.

Examples:
Thank you for your comments, Mr President.

I invited the President, but he didn’t come. (This refers specifically to the US president. )

I invited the president of the company, but he didn’t come.
John Jeffries is our consulting manager.

I’d like to introduce you to President John Jeffries.

This is Doctor Susan Timmons.

Have you called a doctor?

Do you think we should ask the mayor to speak?

Bill Gates is no longer chairman of the board at Microsoft.

Satya Nadella, Chief Executive Officer


There’s one more issue to be aware of with place names. Words like river, lake, road, street, and sea are capitalized if they are part of the name, and lowercase if not. Examples:

The Atlantic Ocean
The Atlantic and Pacific oceans


Capitalize the names of recognized re¬gions, but not of compass points (unless they are they are the names of regions ):

Birds fly south for the winter.

South Dakota is northwest of here.

We also have an office on the East Coast.

I have a house on the Western Shore of France.

We had lunch at a restaurant on the Left Bank.

We live in Southern California.

We travelled around the South of England for a week.


Exceptions
The legal names of companies, products, services, and trademarks are usually capitalized. Some modern names, however, begin with a lowercase letter even though a company name is a proper name.


If you are absolutely certain the name begins with a lowercase letter, feel free to follow suit. Keep in mind, however, that such stylistic devices are often artistic. If you check the company’s legal information on its website, you may find that the legally registered name uses an uppercase letter, as would be expected. If you’re not sure what to do and can’t find a clear way to go, use an uppercase letter.

The names of seasons are not capitalized.
I have hay fever in spring.
My favourite season is autumn.


The nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs within the names of books, films, plays, and other works of art are normally capitalized. The remaining words are not.
The Reduction of Stored Fat in Obese People
The Cat in the Hat

Schlagwörter: Grammatik auf Englisch, Englisch Grammatik, Englische Grammatik, Englisch Grammar, Gramatik auf Englisch, Englisch Gramatik, Englische Gramatik, Englisch Grammar, Groß- und Kleinschreibung Englisch, Englische Groß- und Kleinschreibung, Faustregeln

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