Suche


Navigation

Smalltalk auf Englisch
Englisch Smalltak - Smalltak auf Messen und Reisen, reden über Job und Familie, Urlaub, Sport und das Wetter. Fragen nach dem Befinden. Unterhalten auf Englisch.

Korrespondenz auf Englisch
englische Korrespondenz, englische Briefe verfassen, englische Angebote, englische Mahnbriefe, englische Weihnachtsgrüße, Beschwerdebriefe auf Englisch, Zahlen auf Englisch Korrespondenz

Geschäftsreise auf Englisch
Englisch für die Geschäftsreise, Englisch auf Reisen, Business-Englisch auf Geschäftsreisen, Englisch lernen für Geschäftsreisen

Telefonieren auf Englisch
Englisch Anrufbeantworter, Anruf entgegennehmen auf Englisch, Nachricht hinterlassen auf Englisch, Buchstabieren auf Englisch, Begrüßung auf Englisch

Meetings auf Englisch
Besprechungen auf Englisch, English for Meetings, Englisch für Meetings, Business English Meetings, Meetings in Englisch, Meetings Englisch, Business Englisch Meetings, englischsprachige Meetings

Grammatik auf Englisch
Englische Grammatik, Zeiten in Englisch, Indirekte Rede in Englisch, Präpositionen auf Englisch, englische Satzzeichen, Bedingungssätze auf Englisch, aktiv und passiv Englisch, Konditionalsätze auf Englisch


 

Smalltalk - Erinnern Sie sich noch an mich?

Schlagwörter: Smalltalk auf Reisen, Englisch auf Reisen, Englisch auf Geschäftsreisen, Business Englisch für Geschäftsreisen, korrektes Englisch auf Reisen, englisches Vokabular für die Geschäftsreise

A recent ad for 3M’s Post-It notes shows a couple asleep in bed. The woman has a Post-It on her forehead, on which is written “JANE”. The slogan reads “For the little things you’ll forget”. 3M’s ad agency got this wrong on two counts. Besides the fact that many women ( comprising 65% of the Post-It customer base ) find this ad unfunny, a person’s name is hardly a little thing.
Our own name is probably the most important word in our entire vocabulary – whispered, spoken, and sung to us hundreds of thousands of times in a lifetime. Say that one magic word, and people feel important and respected. It’s embarrassing to forget someone’s name, or worse, to address him wrongly – as did Lady Diana Spencer when she mixed up Prince Charles’ first names during their wedding ceremony.

Many of us would love to have a memory for names. Our problem is forgetting, or not being able to remember names in the first place. Here’s a common complaint: “I’d be introduced to a bunch of people at a party or business meeting and five minutes later would have forgotten most of their names”.

There are some obvious ways to help remember a name. For example, by repeating it immediately during the introduction, “Nice to meet you Ann,
I’m Bill,” or by asking a question of clarification, is that Elisabeth with an “s” or a “z”? Or if it’s an unusual name, by discussing its pronunciation, etymology or place of origin.
You might like to try, though, some unconventional approaches to name memorisation. At parties it can be great fun to NOT introduce each other, but to try to guess your partner’s name: “I sense that your first name starts with a consonant”, or “I’m picking up two syllables, right?” It really doesn’t matter if your first guess is right or wrong, there’s always a recovery like “Oh, of course, but your first name contains a consonant, right?” or “Yes, but your surname ( or your middle name, or your Mother’s surname, etc. ) has two syllables, right?” and so on.

For more formal business situations involving new colleagues, clients or customers, you might find President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s technique more appropriate. He simply imagined a person’s name imprinted on his forehead. Roosevelt attributed his phenomenal name memory to this technique.

You can also play word games to make names more interesting and memorable. Invent alliterative adjectives like Audacious Annie, Beautiful Bea, Creative Christopher... or Provocative Paul. Switching first syllables can be ridiculously memorable: how about Wobbie Rilliams, or Haris Pilton, or Bordon Grown... or Smaul Pith?

Maybe there would be fewer name problems if we were to help each other a bit more during introductions. Twenty five years later, I still remember a brief meeting with a Swiss gentlemen named Mr Tobler, who assured me that he had absolutely no connection with the chocolate bearing the same name, and thus imprinted himself on me in an instant.
Notwithstanding, there will always be occasions when a lapse of memory turns our conversation partner into an unnameable enigma. Back in the 1930’s, the famous conductor Sir Thomas Beecham was waiting in the lobby of a London hotel. He recognised a rather distinguished-looking woman, whom he recalled having met but whose name escaped him. Pausing to say hello, Beecham suddenly remembered that the mystery woman had a brother and – hoping for a clue – asked her how he was doing and whether he was still employed in the same job. “Oh, he’s very well,” the woman answered, “and he’s still King.”

Schlagwörter: Smalltalk auf Reisen, Englisch auf Reisen, Englisch auf Geschäftsreisen, Business Englisch für Geschäftsreisen, korrektes Englisch auf Reisen, englisches Vokabular für die Geschäftsreise

Business English Trainer Weitere Artikel zum Thema Smalltalk auf Englisch finden Sie in unserem monatlich erscheinenden OWAD Business English Trainer.
Testen Sie drei Ausgaben von OWAD Business English Trainer kostenlos. Die erste Ausgabe erhalten Sie jetzt sofort, die anderen beiden während der nächsten zwei Monate.

Hier geht's zur Bestellung.

Archiv

Insiders Wordpower
Insiders Wordpower
mehr...
Business English Trainer
OWAD Business English Trainer
mehr...
OWAD
OWAD
mehr...
Free Test
Free-Test
mehr...
Seminars
Seminars
Meet Paul Smith face to face in one of his popular seminars and trainings.
mehr...
Owad-For-Business
Owad-For-Business
mehr...